ADAM


ADAM
ADAM (Heb. אָדָם), city on the eastern bank of the Jordan River mentioned in Joshua 3:16 as the place where the Jordan ceased flowing at the time of the Israelite crossing. It also appears in the inscriptions of Pharaoh Shishak (10th century B.C.E.). King Solomon's foundries were in the vicinity of Adam (I Kings 7:46; II Chron. 4:17). The place is perhaps also mentioned in Hosea 6:7 and Psalms 68:19, 78:60, and 83:11 as an ancient site of worship. The ford that was situated during ancient times at Adam is marked on the madaba Map and is still found at a place the Arabs call Damiyeh on the road from Shechem to Gilead and Moab. It is south of the confluence of the Jabbok and the Jordan on the one side and north of the mouth of Wadi Fariah on the other. On the small Tell el-Damiyeh near the ford, potsherds from the Canaanite and Israelite periods (Late Bronze to Iron Age I–II) as well as from the Roman and Byzantine periods have been found. -BIBLIOGRAPHY: Kutscher, in: BJPES, 2 (1935), 42; Torczyner, ibid., 11 (1944–5), 9 ff.; Goitein, ibid., 13 (1947), 86–88; Albright, in: AASOR, 6 (1926), 47 ff.; idem, in: BASOR, 19 (1925), 19; J. Garstang, Joshua-Judges (1931), 355; Noth, in: ZDPV, 61 (1938), 288; Glueck, in: BASOR, 90 (1943), 5; idem, in: AASOR, 25–28 (1951), 329–34; Aharoni, Land, index. (Michael Avi-Yonah) ADAM ADAM, Jewish monthly literary journal in the Romanian language. The first number of Adam was published in Bucharest on April 15, 1929. The journal was subsequently published for 12 years, until July 1940, in book form. Its founder and director was the writer and publicist I. Ludo (Isac Iacovitz). He edited the review until 1936, when he left Romania temporarily and sold it to Miron Grindea and Idov Cohn. They continued publication until their emigration from Romania, Miron Grindea to England (where he published a new review under the same name in London in English) and Idov Cohn (Cohen) to Palestine. Adam was a successful publication, reflecting the personality of its editor, Ludo, who wrote most of the articles.   He succeeded in attracting various contributors, intellectuals with various outlooks, among them felix aderca , ury benador , F. Brunea-Fox, Ion Calugaru, avraham feller , Benjamin Fundoianu, Jacob Gropper, Rabbi M.A. Halevy, Michael Landau, Theodor Loewenstein, Marius Mircu, Chief Rabbi Jacob Niemirower, eugen relgis , and A.L. Zissu . Some of them (as well as others) served their literary apprenticeship at Adam. It was a review that refused to surrender to the ghetto mentality and also attracted non-Jewish contributors, among whom the best known were Tudor Arghezi, Gala Galaction, Eugen Lovinescu, and N.D. Cocea. Adam also featured many illustrations, including work by victor brauner , marcel jancu , M.H. Maxy , Jules Perachim, and reuven rubin . Adam also engaged in polemics. Its basic idea was that Jewish-Romanian writers, before they could be Romanian writers, must be Jewish writers. In 1939, Adam published a yearbook on the occasion of its tenth anniversary. -BIBLIOGRAPHY: Adam (1929–40); Almanahul Adam (1939); A. Mirodan, Dictionar neconventional, 1 (1986), 18–21; M. Mircu, Povestea presei evreiesti din Romania (2003), 320–58; H. Kuller, Presa evreiasca bucuresteana (1996), 116–19. (Lucian-Zeev Herscovici (2nd ed.)

Encyclopedia Judaica. 1971.

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  • ADAM — (אָדָם), the first man and progenitor of the human race. The Documentary Hypothesis distinguishes two conflicting stories about the making of man in Scripture (for a contrary view, see U. Cassuto, From Adam to Noah, pp. 71 ff.). In the first… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • ADAM — En hébreu, le nom commun adam , toujours employé au singulier, signifie «homme» en tant qu’espèce et non en tant qu’individu de sexe masculin. L’étymologie en est discutée. Le récit de la Genèse (II, 7) l’a rapproché du mot adamah , «terre», mais …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Adam — may refer to: * Adam (name), a common given name and surname (list of people in that article)Adam, as a word or as an abbreviation, may also refer to:* Adam (Bible), the first man according to the Abrahamic religious tradition * Adam Kadmon, the… …   Wikipedia

  • Adam — bezeichnet: eine Person, die in der Bibel und dem Koran als erster Mensch benannt wird, siehe Adam und Eva den ursprünglichen Menschen in der kabbalistischen Lehre, siehe Adam Qadmon einen Familien sowie männlichen Vornamen, siehe Adam (Name)… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Adam — • First man and father of the human race Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Adam     Adam     † …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Adam — 〈m. 6〉 1. 〈nach bibl. Überlieferung〉 der erste Mensch 2. 〈fig.〉 der Mensch schlechthin ● den alten Adam ausziehen ein neuer Mensch werden; in ihm regt sich der alte Adam der sündhafte Mensch in ihm, der Mensch, der Versuchungen zugänglich ist; im …   Universal-Lexikon

  • ADAM (R. et J.) — ADAM ROBERT (1728 1792) & JAMES (1730 1794) Les architectes et décorateurs Robert et James Adam sont les fils d’un architecte écossais, William Adam. Ce dernier, déjà mêlé au courant du retour à l’antique qui depuis Inigo Jones triomphait en… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Adam — Adam, Édouard Jean * * * (as used in expressions) Adam, pico de Adam, Robert Elsheimer, Adam Mickiewicz, Adam (Bernard) Oehlenschläger, Adam Gottlob Powell, Adam Clayton, Jr. Sedgwick, Adam Sienkiewicz …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Adam — Sm erw. grupp. (12. Jh., als Appellativ) Onomastische Bildung. In der Bibel Name des ersten Menschen, zugleich hebräisches Wort für Mensch, Mann (hebr. ʾāḏām). Seit dem 12. Jh. verschiedene Wortverwendungen, die meist unmittelbar von Bibelstellen …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • Adam — Ad am, n. 1. The name given in the Bible to the first man, the progenitor of the human race. [1913 Webster] 2. (As a symbol) Original sin; human frailty. [1913 Webster] And whipped the offending Adam out of him. Shak. [1913 Webster] {Adam s ale} …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English